How many grades are there in river rafting?

How many levels are there in rafting?

The Six Levels of Every River’s Water Rafting Course. The standard water level ranking system holds six major categories. The scale used is referred to as the International scale of river difficulty and was created by the American Whitewater Association.

What is a Grade 5 river?

The International Scale of River Difficulty is a standardized scale used to rate the safety of a stretch of river, or a single rapid. … Grade 5: Very difficult rapids, High-powerful-irregular waves, difficult to negotiate, the extreme for commercial operations.

Can you do Grade 6 rapids?

Think of the most extreme rapids you’ve seen and make them even more ferocious. Grade 6 rapids will look un-runnable, but under the right circumstances and with the right amount of skill and experience, they can sometimes be possible.

What is a Class 2 rapids?

Class II Whitewater

Novice. Straightforward rapids with wide, clear channels which are evident without scouting. Occasional maneuvering may be required, but rocks and medium-sized waves are easily missed.

How many classes are in rapids?

What Are The Classes Of Rapids According To ISRD? As explained previously, there are six identifiable classes of rapids covered by the International Scale of River Difficulty (ISRD). From Class I to Class VI, all whitewater rapids are categorized based on how difficult they are to paddle in and navigate.

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Can beginners do class 3 rapids?

Beginners can enjoy this type of water. Class 2: Some rough water, maybe some rocks, might require some maneuvering. Basic paddling skills are needed to enjoy this type of water. Class 3: Whitewater, in that the water does appear white due to all the bubbles, small waves, maybe a small drop, but no considerable danger.

What is a Class 3 rapids?

Class III:

Rapids with high, irregular waves. Narrow passages that often require precise manoeuvring. ( This is the one that’s a whole lot of fun) Class IV: Long, difficult rapids with constricted passages that often require complex maneuvering in turbulent water.